Khakendra Pun

Then one day, under the fate of my own destiny, running into a western tourist above our village, I told him about my dream of wanting to come to America. Later through the help of his mother, I landed at the airport in San Francisco, California, and began a completely new journey. For the next seven years, unable to rent a place to live, in between many odd jobs, unable to return home, between layers of nightmares while trying to get a Green Card, sleeping inside my car, I finished handwriting my memoir. Later, on a found laptop computer on the side of a highway, I typed my whole book and began selling my manuscripts to people wherever I could. Then, in the darkest hour of my life, losing my dear mother, I headed out to Midwest, Iowa.

For the next several years, while struggling to achieve my Green Card and U.S. Citizenship, between trial and error, I headed out to East Coast in New York, hoping to better my future. While struggling to build my future, in such a fast-paced life, after doing seventy-seven different odd jobs and living at 79 different places, I then became a yellow cab driver and continued writing. Seven years later, I wrote my fourth memoir, Confessions Through the Rearview Mirror. Meantime, I established the Ulleri Foundation, a non-profit charity to help underprivileged remote mountain villages in Nepal, which has been one of my lifelong dreams ever since I left our village. For more info, please check our website www.ullerifoundation.org. N A M A S T E.